Date

June 16-18th

Format

Online

Limited spots!

Hurry up!

International speakers

Experts from around the world.

Organizers / Strength in unity

ARE YOU PASSIONATE ABOUT NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION? / Enjoy an unique event

English/Spanish

Conferences of the Congress will be available in Spanish or English, at the user’s choice.

  • COMPLETE CONGRESS Pack

    Congress + Poster Session + Previous Workshop + Online FACS Course

  • Congress + Workshop Pack

    Congress + Poster Session + Previous Workshop

  • Congress Pack

    Congress + Poster Session

100% Online

Participation and interaction through videoconference and question time.

Live or Recorded

You will be able to watch the Congress Conferences and the Poster Session both Live and Recorded (for 6 months).

Virtual Poster Session

We have adapted our Congress to the virtual environment! You will be able to view the Posters in PDF and talk to their authors online.

Speakers (in order of appearance) / What more could you ask for?

Jan Schneider

Researcher in educational technologies at the DIPF - Leibniz Institute for Research and Information in Education

Ronald E. Riggio

Henry R. Kravis Professor of Leadership and Organizational Psychology and former Director of the Kravis Leadership Institute at Claremont McKenna College

John White

School of Policy and Practice in Dublin City University (DCU)

Fabian Ramseyer

Habilitated senior researcher and psychotherapist at the Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy at University of Bern

Mollie Ruben

Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of Maine. Director of the Emotion, Pain, and Interpersonal Communication Laboratory

Vincent Denault

SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology of McGill University, and a Lecturer in the Faculty of Law of University of Sherbrooke

Norah Dunbar

Professor of Communication at the University of California Santa Barbara

Eva Krumhuber

Associate professor in experimental psychology at University College London, United Kingdom

David Matsumoto

PhD in psychology. Professor of Psychology at San Francisco State University. Founder and Director of SFSU’s Culture and Emotion Research Laboratory. Director of Humintell.

Anderson Tamborim

Expert in analysis of facial micro-expressions. Certified in Facial Expression Analysis of Emotion by Paul Ekman International.

Program

Congress Direction

alanc_behaviorandlaw

Alan Crawley

Degree with honors in Psychology. Diploma in Nonverbal Communication (Universidad Austral). University Professor (Universidad del Salvador) and researcher.

Scientific Committee

President:

Dr. Rafael López – Behavior & Law Corp President

Members:

  • Dr. Ángel García Collantes (UDIMA)
  • Dr. Andrew Sand (Heritage University)
  • Dra. María José Garrido (Guardia Civil – CESEDEN)
  • Dr. Sergio Martínez (Cuerpo Nacional de Policía)
  • Dra. Lilia Mestas (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México).
  • Dr. Fernando Gordillo (Universidad Camilo José Cela)
  • Dra. Guadalupe Morales (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México).
  • Dr. José Luis González ( Secretaría de Estado de Seguridad)
  • Dr. Ángel Cuñado (Fundación Universitaria Behavior & Law)

Program / Connect to a unique program

IMPORTANT:

The times shown are for Spain (UTC +02:00).

If you want to convert them to your time zone you can use the following link:

https://www.zeitverschiebung.net

Opening

Opening of the Conference
 Dr. Ángel García Collantes / Director of the Behavior Analysis Chair.
 Dr. Andrew Sund/ President of Heritage University.
 Dr. Rafael López Pérez / President of Behavior & Law Corp.

Congress Presentation

Presentation
 Alan Crawley/ Congress Director

The Role of Nonverbal and Emotional Communication in Effective Leadership

Description: Leadership is, by its very nature, a relationship between leaders and followers. Unlike many human relationships, however, leadership often takes place at a distance. For example, most citizens may never meet their region’s or nation’s top leaders, but they are affected by them, and it can be said that they have a relationship with them. This presentation reviews the myriad ways that nonverbal and emotional communication is used by leaders (and followers) in the creation and maintenance of leader-follower relationships.
Ronald E. Riggio: Ronald E. Riggio, Ph.D. is the Henry R. Kravis Professor of Leadership and Organizational Psychology and former Director of the Kravis Leadership Institute at Claremont McKenna College. Dr. Riggio is a leadership and nonverbal communication scholar with more than two dozen authored or edited books and more than 200 articles/book chapters. He recently (2020) received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Leadership Association.

The Value of Nonverbal Communication in Education

Description: This presentation explores the value of nonverbal communication within the sphere of education. To this end, the presentation commences with a brief discussion on factors which have influenced its current status in education. The presentation then moves to examine the value of nonverbal communication for education and educators, with reference to some relevant literature and research.  In particular, this examination considers some relevant theories and research in the field of nonverbal communication which are influential in creating positive learning environments. The presentation concludes with a summary of the key nonverbal factors which are important for all who are involved in the facilitation of learning.  This presentation is relevant to all involved in teaching and learning, and indeed, all who share knowledge and information.
John White: Dr John White works in the School of Policy and Practice in Dublin City University (DCU).  He works on both undergraduate and post-graduate education programmes. He has worked as a primary teacher, primary school principal and primary school inspector. His doctoral research examined nonverbal communication in the primary school classroom. John’s research interests include human communication (with a specific focus on nonverbal communication), classroom nonverbal communication, arts-based research, nonverbal communication and narrative inquiry, embodied cognition and school leadership.  He is the co-author of ‘The Classroom X –Factor: The Power of Body Language and Nonverbal Communication in Teaching’(Routledge, 2011) and with Professor David Givens (Gonzaga University and Centre for Nonverbal Studies) has just finished writing ‘The Routledge Dictionary of Nonverbal Communication’ (due to be published in May 2021 by Rutledge).

Break Time

Nonverbal attunement in dyadic relationships: A core concept with many facets

Description: Social interaction in humans is characterized by a dynamic exchange of information on numerous channels and levels of communication. Many of the signals exchanged between individuals are strongly influenced and shaped dynamically throughout the course of an interaction. One particularly interesting facet is the phenomenon of bidirectional influence, readily visible in e.g. the attunement of nonverbal behaviors. Nonverbal synchrony - one example of this phenomenon of attunement - was found to be associated with positive aspects of interaction in several studies. However, recent findings suggest that attunement may be much more than just the embodiment of relationship quality. This talk focuses on recent empirical findings, new developments in methodological approaches, and outlines possible uses and misuses of attunement in social settings.
Fabian Ramseyer: PD Dr. Fabian Ramseyer is a habilitated senior researcher and psychotherapist at the Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy in Bern (University of Bern, Switzerland). He works in clinical practice, research, and in his own startup selling innovative video-technology hardware. During his PhD, Fabian developed an automated tool for the assessment of nonverbal synchrony in videotaped psychotherapy sessions, called motion.

Person Perception in Doctor-Patient Relationships

Description: In this presentation, we will examine what person perception is, the role of nonverbal behavior, and why it matters in doctor-patient relationships. Finally, we will examine whether this skill can be improved and what that could mean for the healthcare system at large
Mollie Ruben: Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of Maine. Director of the Emotion, Pain, and Interpersonal Communication Laboratory. US Department of Veterans Affairs Affiliate Researcher. Dr. Ruben studies social perception and the contribution of nonverbal behaviors to both how we perceive others and how we behave as the ones being perceived. She has two complementary lines of research, one in basic social psychological research examining social perception or the ability to accurately perceive another person’s states (e.g., physical pain, emotions/affect), traits (e.g., personality), and characteristics (hireability, sexual orientation) and a second line of research in health services and health psychology applying social psychological methods to the analysis of doctor-patient communication and health disparities.

Break Time

The Science (and Pseudoscience) of Deception Detection

Description: Deception is studied by a global community of researchers. Thousands of articles are published on the subject since the 1960s. Researchers from different disciplines, affiliated to several universities, located in various countries, contribute to the literature covering different topics, including the detection of deception. Unfortunately, rather than turning to peer-reviewed knowledge, several justice and security practitioners have turned to pseudoscientific techniques and approaches. But what are the dangers of such techniques and approaches? Why is peer-reviewed knowledge on the detection of deception important for justice and security practitioners?
Vincent Denault: SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology of McGill University, and a Lecturer in the Faculty of Law of University of Sherbrooke. He holds a Ph.D. in Communication (University of Montreal, 2020) and a Master of Laws (University of Quebec in Montreal, 2015). His research focuses on issues related to witness testimony, credibility assessment, deception detection, and nonverbal behavior in courtrooms. Vincent Denault is the co-founder and co-director of the Center for Studies in Nonverbal Communication Sciences of the Research Center of the Montreal Mental Health University Institute. In addition to his work in academia, Vincent Denault is a lawyer and a coroner investigating deaths that occurred as a result of negligence or in obscure or violent circumstances.

Detecting deception via nonverbal cues

Description: While there have been some calls to abandon the use of nonverbal cues in deception, they still do provide some useful information for people trying to distinguish truths from lies.  In this presentation, Dr. Norah Dunbar reviews some of the historical reasons why there has been an over-emphasis on facial cues and suggests an alternative to looking for individual kinesic nonverbal cues or microexpressions.  She reviews what nonverbal cues are actually diagnostic and suggests that instead of relying on individual cues, we look at three general clusters or patterns of cues which combine verbal and nonverbal codes and reveal deception: tension, uncertainty, and cognitive load.
Norah Dunbar: Professor of Communication at the University of California Santa Barbara where she teaches courses in nonverbal and interpersonal communication, communication theory, and deception detection. She has published over 65 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters and has presented over 100 papers at National and International conferences. Her 2021 co-edited book Detecting Trust and Deception in Group Interaction (Springer) is a multi-disciplinary look at different nonverbal codes that can be used to detect deception in a variety of group negotiation contexts.

Break Time

Machine and human analysis of facial expressions of emotion

Description: Machine analysis of human affective behaviour is increasingly of interest to both scientists and lay people. The promise of automatically detecting and scoring emotional states carries significant potential to facilitate and augment existing methods of emotion assessment. Besides the potential use in numerous applied fields, automated systems can also act as an important tool to increase the accessibility of nonverbal communication analysis as a behavioural measure. In the past, relevant efforts for machine analysis have often been hampered by a lack of comprehensive and labelled sets of dynamic emotional portrayals. This talk aims to provide insights into automatic emotion classification efforts using dynamic expressions of emotion and highlight similarities and differences between humans and machines in affect recognition.
Eva Krumhuber: Associate professor in experimental psychology at University College London, United Kingdom. Her research investigates the socio-cognitive and affective processes in human perception and behaviour. This includes research on facial expressions including dynamic facial actions and their role in emotion interpretation. Eva obtained her PhD degree in social psychology from Cardiff University for which she won the Hadyn Ellis Prize for Outstanding Dissertation. Subsequent postdoctoral work in Switzerland and Germany led to the development of new animation software for an award-winning market research project, as well as technological applications to aid cultural understanding and empathy in children and young adults. Besides her contributions to psychology, her research has proven relevant in industry for the successful modelling of emotions in virtual characters, also being commercially used by the film and video games industry. Eva has published widely within the field of psychology and computer science, and currently serves as Associate Editor of the Journal of Nonverbal Behavior.

Facial Expressions are Special

Description: In this talk, Dr. Matsumoto will describe why facial expressions, and especially expressions of emotion, are special types of nonverbal behavior. He will provide an overview of the messages signaled by facial expressions, and then describe why emotions are special types of mental phenomena. Dr. Matsumoto will discuss what are emotions, the triggers and functions of emotion, and then the special class of facial expressions of emotion known as microexpressions. His talk will conclude with my thoughts concerning the benefits of reading facial expressions of emotion.
David Matsumoto: PhD. in Psychology. Professor of Psychology at San Francisco State University and is the founder and director of the Culture and Emotion Research Laboratory at the same university. Director of Humintell. He is one of the world's most recognized experts in the fields of emotion, nonverbal behavior, deception and culture. He has produced more than 400 academic papers, including books, journal articles, book chapters and conference presentations.

Congress Clossure

 Dr. Rafael López Pérez / Behavior & Law Corp President.
 Alan Crawley / Congress Director

Workshops

IMPORTANT:

  • Both workshops will be held simultaneously via videoconference.
  • With the TOTAL CONGRESS PACK or the "Congress + Workshop" Pack you will have to choose one of the two workshops.

Developing Charisma Through Emotional, Nonverbal, and Social Skills (ENGLISH Workshop)


IMPORTANT:
Workshop via videoconference

EXCLUSIVELY in English

Description:

In this workshop, we will explore the development of “personal charisma” through improving skills in nonverbal and social communication. Paramount among those skills is the ability to communicate emotions effectively and to manage one’s self-presentation, poise, and “savoir-faire” (which translates to “knowing how to be” in social situations). We will use a comprehensive model for understanding both emotional and social skills and focus on ways to develop these skills in order to enhance our personal charisma.


Ronald E. Riggio:

Ronald E. Riggio, Ph.D. is the Henry R. Kravis Professor of Leadership and Organizational Psychology and former Director of the Kravis Leadership Institute at Claremont McKenna College. Dr. Riggio is a leadership and nonverbal communication scholar with more than two dozen authored or edited books and more than 200 articles/book chapters. He recently (2020) received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Leadership Association.

Vaccinate your audience from death by Powerpoint by aligning your objectives, words and non-verbal communication. (Workshop in Spanish)

IMPORTANT: Workshop via videoconference

EXCLUSIVELY in Spanish

Description:

One evening in Athens in the year 399 B.C., in the middle of the public square Socrates is accused of corrupting the minds of the young. Instead of pleading guilty Socrates spoke to the audience declaring that the unexamined life is a meaningless life and there is no point in living it. At the end of the speech, Socrates took a sip from a poisoned cup and that night life left his body.  The message communicated that evening has influenced thousands of people and has been taken as the basis for entire civilizations. Today, almost 2500 years later, the message is still alive. The power of the word has no limits, in this workshop we will study and practice how to align our non-verbal language with our words and objectives to maximize the potential of our message when speaking in public.


Jan Schneider:

Dr. Jan Schneider is currently a researcher in educational technologies at the DIPF | Leibniz Institute for Research and Information in Education. During his doctoral studies he researched the design, development and application of tools to facilitate the learning of effective use of non-verbal communication for public speaking. Four times, his public speaking tools have received the award for the best innovative prototype for education at different scientific conferences. He has published more than 30 scientific articles for conferences and journals with academic impact.

Poster Session

During 17th June, a virtual space will be available to consult the Scientific Posters presented and to interact virtually with their authors.

Facial Action Coding System – FACS

Format: 100% Online

Duration: 5 Weeks

Regular price: 370€

The course is done in Spanish

En este curso de codificación facial avanzada (FACS) se abordarán los principales aspectos relacionados con el procedimiento de codificación científica de la expresión facial de las emociones.

Conocerá los principios básicos que involucran a las Unidades de Acción Facial (AUs) y Descriptores de acción Facial (ADs).

La investigación científica de la expresión facial de la emoción es el único mecanismo de análisis no verbal universal y que cuenta con un instrumento reconocido internacionalmente, el FACS (Facial Action Coding System), el cual permite codificar cualquier movimiento facial visible y a través de esa codificación de las acciones faciales podemos, entre otras cosas, identificar la verdadera emoción que el individuo analizado está sintiendo por medio de las micro-expresiones.

Entre las principales utilidades está la evaluación de veracidad y detección de comportamiento simulado, siendo especialmente útil para investigadores forenses, psicólogos, miembros de Fuerzas y Cuerpos de Seguridad y afines, que encontrarán en la ciencia de la codificación de la expresión facial de la emoción una herramienta poderosa para la evaluación de la conducta humana.

Curso impartido por Anderson Tamborim – Experto en Lenguaje Corporal, Análisis de Micro Expresiones Faciales, Ingeniería Social y Investigación Científica de Fraudes en Ambiente Corporativo. Certificado Codificación Científica de Micro Expresiones por Paul Ekman International (PEI) a través del FACS (Facial Action Coding System) Test, Humintell, F-MGIFCC (Freitas-Magalhães Group International FACS Certified Coder).

Congress, Workshops and Posters / 100% Online

Workshops (june 16)

  • 2 simultaneous workshops (choose one).

  • Live streaming of the workshops, simultaneously, via videoconference.

Poster Session (june 17)

  • Presentation of scientific research in poster format with a forum for communication with the authors during the presentation day.

Congress (june 18)

  • Live streaming of the event through Streaming Platform.

  • DEFERRED display of the event’s conferences during the 6 months following the event.

  • The conferences will be available in English and Spanish.

Facial Action Coding System (FACS) Course (june 21)

  • Online Course (in SPANISH) through Virtual Classroom of Behavior & Law:

    • FullHD Videoclasses
    • Questionnaires and activities
    • Continuous mentoring
    • Behavior & Law – UDIMA Certificate

Call for papers!

May the universe see your fantastic research.

As you would expect at any Science Congress, we will provide a space for different researchers to present their work…this time around, in a virtual environment!

Registration fees / the surplus will be used for Behavior & Law's non-profit work.

Congress Pack

100

FIRST 100 PLACES
(Regular price: 120€)


Access to Congress (English or Spanish) (june 18).

Access to Poster Session (june 17).

Certificate of Attendance to the Congress.

Congress + Workshop Pack

190

FIRST 20 PLACES
(Regular price: 210€)


Access to Congress (English or Spanish) (june 18).

Access to Poster Session (june 17).

Access to 1 Workshop (your choice) (june 16).

Certificate of Attendance to the Congress.

Workshop Diploma.

20% discount on the regular price for members of Special Groups.

The following are considered special groups:

  • Alumni Behavior & Law Basic / Premium.
  • CPBA (Criminal Profiling & Behavioral Analysis) members.
  • Udima students/former students.
  • Heritage University students/former students.
  • FCS/law enforcement (State, regional and local) members.
  • Prison Institutions members.
  • Professional Association of Criminology of the Community of Madrid members.

It is essential to send proof of belonging to this group.

Registrants will receive an e-mail with instructions and passwords for connection via streaming.

Instructions will be sent 48 hours before the start of the event.

Any questions? / Contact us

Call us or send us a Whatsapp

+1 407 630 7675

…or fill in this form

Contact Us
I have read and accept the Privacy Policy (see below) *
The Behavior and Law University Foundation, informs you:
Liable party Behavior & Law University Foundation
NIF: G86851961
Registered office: C/Simón Hernández, nº 65 – 28936 Móstoles (Madrid, Spain)
Phone: 912388418
Email: info@behaviorandlaw.com
Purpose Your personal information will be processed with the purpose of attend your questions.
Legitimacy The legal foundation for processing of your personal information is provided by your express consent when filling in and sending the corresponding registration form.
Recipients Personally identifiable information will not be shared with third-parties.
Rights We inform you that you can freely exercise your Rights to Access, Rectification, Withdrawal of Consent, Object and to Object to Automated Processing. If you so choose to exercise any of the aforementioned rights, please contact us through the following email address:
info@behaviorandlaw.com
If you would like more information regarding our Privacy Policy, please refer to the following link: https://behaviorandlaw.com/privacy-policy/